Grants for music therapy programs

  • As social media continues to create opportunities to interact directly with fans, it is important to be proactive on each of your channels to make sure you’re aggregating every potential listener. After all, you don’t want to run the risk of falling out of your new followers’ memory in between visits to their city. Whether used by accident or on purpose, it does tend to work. If you look closely at the melody of “Sugar, We’re Goin’ Down” by Fall Out Boy, you’ll notice it places the same amount of focus on those short scale intervals. The first vocal line even sounds like a nursery rhyme, with a see-saw-style melody: D-E-F#-E-D-E-F#-E-D.
  • Tone and slap sounds are both produced by striking the drum closer to its edge where there’s more tension in the skin than in the middle. It is actually the contact area of the fingers that determines the pitch of the strike. In my 2008 piece for Greek Byzantine choir and strings, Nativity Kontakion, I discovered a beautiful harmonic structure based around the Byzantine whole step you get when you divide the octave into fourteen 72nds — a bit wider than the whole step on the piano, which is twelve 72nds of an octave wide. Invert that wide “14/72” whole step, and you get a minor seventh narrower than the usual one. It so happens that this narrower minor seventh is almost equivalent to the seventh partial — one of those pure, God-made mathematical ratios that fell out of favor when equal temperament took over.
  • Reverbs come in many shapes and sizes, but a good rule of thumb is to use shorter reverbs like rooms and plates for more upbeat songs, and longer reverbs like halls for slower ballads. Most reverbs and delays can be synced to the tempo of the track, allowing you to dial in just the right amount of decay. Try setting the decay time so the effect fades away just before the next phrase begins. But don’t get too comfortable with that one, here’s perhaps the most well-known melody of the bunch: the first two unique notes of Beethoven’s 5th Symphony. The most classic-est of classic major thirds.