R&b artists 2016

  • By now, your vocal should be sounding great — nice and punchy with just the right frequency balance and the perfect amount of space. But people have short attention spans these days, so you’ve got to shake things up if you want to keep them interested for three whole minutes. “Without Me”: To start, we have an arpeggiated riff making some jazzy tetrads: E♭m to G♭add9 and D♭ to A♭m7, and then watch out at the end of the bridge when they sneak in a C♭m. The first two choruses extend from eight to twelve bars by repeating their second halves, which I think creates a kind of pang of abandonment at the end of the song when the repetition doesn’t come back. Another thing about these choruses is how their stanzas all begin and end in the middle of the bars. Most lyrics begin and end near the bar line, so when we hear lyrics phrased all off-center like this, we can’t tell whether we’re being rushed or being left behind. Do I smell a songwriter’s homework assignment?
  • Print out some hard copies, go to the venue, and hang them up there (or ask the venue to do that for you). Your poster in a venue’s window maximizes your chances of reaching foot traffic and audiences from other shows. But if you’re already printing posters, why not put them up in local businesses and stores as well? And make sure to hang some up at local colleges, band rehearsal spaces, or anywhere else you think you’d find people interested in music. It might also help to run your catalog through Royalty Exchange’s Know Your Worth app. This free, no-obligation tool gives songwriters an estimated value of their catalog, or potentially a verified offer from pre-qualified investors. Showing this to a lender provides a real, third-party value for your catalog, and can even be an alternative source of funds if the loan process doesn’t work out.